A Garden Hack

Spring is, without a doubt, the most exciting time here on the farm.  For me, it all starts when the first daffodil greets the day with her sunny cheeks pointed upwards towards the sky.   Each autumn I plant a smattering of daffodil bulbs.  With no grand plan, I stick them in the ground here and there... with no rhyme or reason other than to forget where they've been planted and subsequently be surprised by their appearance, the following spring.

Daffodils are Spring's first act- an introduction- before  a cascade of color begins to unfold.

We are knee-deep in the first part of perennial season now.  All of the plants are up and full, and their beautiful blooms are opening in a finely choreographed pageant.  Familiar scents fill the air... carried along by the flutter of delicate butterfly wings.

If you are a gardener, then you will know that it's now, when all of the perennial plants are beginning to fill out our gardens, when we wish to say goodbye to the limp greenery left behind by the now withered daffodil blossoms.

I have never thought it a good idea to simply cut off the remaining daffodil plants.

To me, it seems that the energy of the plant needs to return to the bulb naturally, so that that energy can be utilized in the production of new bulbs.  But that leaves us gardeners with the problem of what to do with the unsightly daffodil greens.

I simply take those limp leaves and stems and braid them together. 

Then I curl the end of the braid right back down to the beginning of the braid and shove the ends through the base of the braid....

 creating a braided loop.

I think these add a little interest to the garden, without detracting from the second act... the perennials.  In time, the daffodil plant dies off- and, once brown and dry, is easily removed.  Then the bulb sits dormant until the following spring; returning even bigger and showier than before.

Before:

After: 

You have probably figured out that I love gardening.  I am happiest when my fingers are in the dirt, or when I am harvesting and eating the fruits of my labor.  To me, gardening is the most peaceful activity; and its rewards are unparalleled. 

I love cottage style gardens.... those gardens that are chock full of all types of flowers.  I don't plan ahead, or stick to a color theme.  I plant by feel.  To me, no colors clash if they are in a garden.  The more colorful, the better!  I also pay little attention to symmetry.... as I am not particularly a rule-follower.  Somehow, in spite of my quirky style, my gardens seem to work.  They make me happy and that is really all that matters.

The tiny cottage garden in front of Maven Haven is beginning to bloom and I could not be happier.  You would be amazed to know how many flowers I have stuffed into this little space.  Name it... and it's probably in there!

Outside of the garden fence is a knock-out rose bush.  Although the blossoms are not as showy as an old fashioned rose bush, the easy care is a worthwhile trade-off.

 Sammie takes the name literally, as he seems to think this is the perfect spot to be "knocked out"!


The vegetable garden is progressing beautifully. 

 We are harvesting lots of salad greens and asparagus right now, 

and will soon have sugar peas to eat as well.

It's that time of year when I feel a sublime sense of contentment. 

 Every part of the farm feels "right"... like there is just nothing I would change.

PS:

The question was asked - "What is so good about Amish donuts?"

It's a hard question to answer without offering you a taste.  When you bite into this sublimely soft and squishy ring of fried pillowy yeast dough that has been dipped in a maple glaze while it was still hot... you experience breaking through a slightly solid glaze and sinking your teeth into the most delicious bite of sweet, doughy heaven you can imagine.

Like I said.... you gotta experience it for yourself.  And those of you who are local and have had them are now nodding your heads in agreement.

Even Hubbs, who is not a dessert-eater finds them irresistible.

Comments

colleen said…
What a great way to tidy up the daffodil greens.As always your gardens look amazing. All I have to say is you won't know an Amish donut until you've had one.
Lisa said…
Your Amish donuts must be like the Mennonite apple fritters. To die for! I have your same gardening style. The only rule that I kinda follow is really low plants on the outside of the border. But other than that it's a free for all!

Lisa
jaz@octoberfarm said…
amish doughnuts have that effect on many people which i know from seeing the lines that form when they are selling them. we had the most perfect memorial day yesterday. the weather could not have been better. your gardens look wonderful. isn't it amazing how much you can plant in a small space? i have literally planted hundreds of perennials this year and it hasn't made a dent!
Marsha said…
Spring is my favorite too!!!
daisy g said…
I will be braiding my daff greens next season. Ours have already yellowed and been cut. Thanks for the unique idea.

The garden looks splendid, all of it! Enjoy the fruits of your labor.
Marcia LaRue said…
OMG ... now I want an Amish donut in the worst possible way!! LOL
I love wandering around and through your gardens ... both flower and veggie ... they are all so beautiful!!
This N That said…
I used to braid my Daffys until it became a back-breaking task..After that, I just twisted them, bent them over and put a rubber band around them..And then I never planted any more..There are so many around here that I can just share!!
Your flowers are lovely..Such a joy to you, I'm sure..
My favorite kind of doughnuts too..I don't know when I last had one ..
Enjoy these temps and clouds..Gonna have a heat wave soon..I can't believe it's June already..Hugs
phyllis Schmitz said…
Daffodils in ist photo remind me of one my mother called Scrambled Eggs so
many years ago as I am 87 now.
THE BEARDED ONE said…
WE HAVE A BUNCH OF DOUBLE KNOCKOUT ROSES,,,SEVERAL IN A MEMORIAL GARDEN WHERE MY WIFE'S BROTHERS AND SISTERS WHO HAVE PASSED ON ARE HONORED/REMEMBERED... NAME PLATES FOR EACH ONE..AND THE BOYS WHO HAVE IN THE MILITARY HAVE AMERICAN FLAGS...IT WAS ALMOST TOTALLY DESTROYED WHEN WE HAD 9" OF RAIN IN TWO HOURS...IT ACTUALLY WASHED AWAY ONE OF THE PLAUEK'S...WE HAVE REBUILT THE WALL AND HAD ANOTHER PLAQUE REDONE...THESE POSTS ARE JUST TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE...SMILING...I LOVE AND ENJOY THEM SO MUCH..THANK YOU !!!!!!


EDGAR C. BEARD